Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

Adverse Childhood Experiences

Additional Resources

The Adverse Childhood Experiences Study. This site offers a clear overview of the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study.

Reducing Adverse Childhood Experiences by Building Community Capacity: A Summary of Washington Family Policy Council Research Findings. This study, recently published in the Journal of Prevention & Intervention in the Community, demonstrates the strong impact of community networks to interrupt health and social problems. Findings suggest that community networks reduce health and safety problems for the entire community population. Further, community networks with high community capacity reduced ACEs in young adults ages 18–34.

Adverse Childhood Experiences and Population Health in Washington: The Face of a Chronic Health Disaster This paper presents results from the 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

ACE Course This online course, developed by the Family Planning Council, covers brain science, the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study, and resilience research. Participants will learn the prevalence and high-cost lifelong outcomes of ACEs, the vital role of culture and community to optimize well being, and how to use this emerging research to create transformative conversations.

ACE Response ACE Response grew out of a partnership between Prevent Child Abuse America and the University at Albany (SUNY) School of Social Welfare. This website seeks to raise awareness of ACEs and mobilize comprehensive responses to ACEs across the lifespan in order to prevent ACEs and their consequences. ACE Response supports the integration of prevention/intervention research with practice wisdom in local areas to promote resilience, recovery, and transformation. It highlights the healing power of social networks, which can provide a recovery context that enhances the services offered.

 

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