Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

The Role of Public Health in Preventing Underage Drinking and Excessive Drinking by Adults

Event date: 
June 26, 2013 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Type: 
Webinar
Sponsor: 
The Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Prevention of Underage Drinking (ICCPUD); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Location: 
-

The Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Prevention of Underage Drinking (ICCPUD) webinar series that launched on January 30, 2013, is an opportunity for federal agencies to address how they have supported states, territories and communities in reducing underage drinking by sharing resources, examples and sustainable efforts to address underage drinking.  The next ICCPUD Webinar is: The Role of Public Health in Preventing Underage Drinking and Excessive Drinking by Adults and will be hosted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Excessive alcohol use, including underage drinking, accounts for an average of 80,000 deaths and 2.3 million Years of Potential Life Lost in the United States each year, and cost the U.S. $223.5 billion in 2006. In this webinar, national experts will provide an overview of recent scientific findings on underage and binge drinking in the U.S. as well as Community Preventive Services Task Force (CPSTF)-recommended strategies to address it; examine new research findings on the relationship between state alcohol policies and underage drinking; discuss the current status of alcohol regulations in the U.S.; and present case studies on the translation of CPSTF-recommended strategies into public health practice.

For more information on this series and to register for the upcoming webinar, please visit:

 

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